Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Walking at Alsager .




















Places to see in ( Alsager - UK )

Alsager is a town and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England, to the north-west of the city of Stoke-on-Trent, and east of the railway town of Crewe. The town has a population of 11,775. The civil parish is bordered by the parishes of Betchton to the north, Church Lawton to the north-east and east, Kidsgrove in Staffordshire to the south-east, Audley Rural, in Staffordshire to the south, Barthomley to the south-west, Haslington to the west, and Hassall to the north-west. 

In the centre of Alsager is a lake, Alsager Mere. This isolated pool, once the focal point of the town, is only accessible by two fenced public viewing areas and by local residents who have gardens adjoining the waters. Alsager has hosted an annual summer carnival since 1998. Until June 2009 the summer carnival was located in Milton Gardens but it has since moved to the Alsager School Playing Fields to increase capacity. In 2007 Alsager was awarded Fairtrade Town status by the Fairtrade Foundation.

Alsager was recorded as 'Eleacier' in the Domesday Book, and was a small farming village until the 19th century when, due to its rail connections and rural character, it became a home of choice for pottery works managers from the nearby Federation of Six Towns which later became the city of Stoke-on-Trent. During the Second World War, a large armaments factory was built outside Alsager at Radway Green, and the town expanded dramatically to house the influx of factory workers. 

The first Roman Catholic church in Alsager was one of the wooden huts and was attended mainly by the Lithuanians, most of whom were Roman Catholic. The Anglican churches are Christ Church (1789), and St. Mary Magdalene (1898). Alsager previously had three Methodist churches at Hassall Road (Wesleyan), Wesley Place (Wesleyan), and Crewe Road (Primitive Methodist). By December 2009 two Methodist churches remained, but today there is just one. The Roman Catholic community is served from St Gabriel's Church. 

Formerly housed on Manchester Metropolitan University's Alsager campus, Alsager Arts Centre had a public programme of touring new performance and visual art work presented in two intensive seasons – September to November and January to March. The centre has now moved to the university's Crewe campus, as its Alsager site has closed. In August 2010 Alsager hosted the first annual Alsager Arts Festival. Alsager hosts the annual Alsager Music Festival which takes place in Milton Gardens.

Alsager is close to junction 16 of the M6 motorway, and is served by Alsager railway station on the Crewe to Derby Line and the semi-fast Crewe to Euston Line, both services operating hourly during the working day. Buses (the number 3) run to Crewe and Hanley every 20 minutes. The 78 bus service links Alsager with Sandbach, Nantwich, Leighton Hospital and Rode Heath once an hour, and service 315 with Congleton and Rode Heath about three times a day.

The Trent and Mersey Canal runs just to the north-east to the town, forming part of the Cheshire Ring Canal Walk and the South Cheshire Way footpath. The canal's towpath and the nearby 'Salt Line' are also routes of the National Cycle Network. Alsager town centre is characterised by independent and charity shops. The only national chain supermarkets in the town are a medium-sized Asda supermarket and Sainsbury's Local. Alsager has several parks. The town's main park is Milton Garden, which has an ornamental sunken garden, a skatepark, a small children's football pitch and a play area.

( Alsager - UK ) is well know as a tourist destination because of the variety of places you can enjoy while you are visiting Alsager . Through a series of videos we will try to show you recommended places to visit in Alsager - UK

















































































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The Jodrell Bank Observatory (originally the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station, then the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories from 1966 to 1999; /ˈdʒɒdrəl/) is a British observatory that hosts a number of radio telescopes, and is part of the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Manchester. The observatory was established in 1945 by Sir Bernard Lovell, a radio astronomer at the University of Manchester who wanted to investigate cosmic rays after his work on radar during the Second World War. It has since played an important role in the research of meteors, quasars, pulsars, masers and gravitational lenses, and was heavily involved with the tracking of space probes at the start of the Space Age. The managing director of the observatory is Professor Simon Garrington.





MowCop

































Mow Cop /ˈmaʊˈkɒp/ is an isolated village which straddles the Cheshire–Staffordshire border, and is divided between the North West and West Midlands regions of England. It is 24 miles south of Manchester and 6 miles north of Stoke-on-Trent, lying on a steep hill of the same name rising up to 335 m (1099 ft) above sea level. The village fringes the Cheshire Plain to the west and the hills of the Staffordshire Moorlands to the east. For population details taken at the 2011 census see Kidsgrove.

The name is first recorded as "Mowel" around 1270 AD, and is believed to be derived from either the Anglo-Saxon Mūga-hyll, meaning "heap-hill", with copp = "head" added later, or the Common Celtic ancestor of Welsh moel (= hill), with Anglo-Saxon copp added later.

At the village's summit, men once quarried stone to make into querns, used since the Iron Age for milling corn; this trade ended during the Victorian period. The village also has a long history of coal mining. A 65 ft rock feature called the Old Man O'Mow sits in one of the quarry areas and is believed to be the site of an ancient cairn. The most dominant feature is Mow Cop Castle which is a folly of a ruined castle at the summit of the hill, built in 1754. Both Mow Cop and Old Man O'Mow are under the management of the National Trust and sit on the walking route of the Cheshire Gritstone Trail. The village was served by a railway station which was opened by the North Staffordshire Railway on 9 October 1848.

Mow Cop is also noteworthy as the birthplace of the Primitive Methodist movement. Starting in 1800, Hugh Bourne from Stoke-on-Trent and William Clowes from Burslem began holding open-air prayer meetings. On 31 May 1807, a large 14-hour camp meeting was held, leading to development of the Primitive Methodist Church in 1810. These camp meetings became a regular feature at Mow Cop, with camps held to celebrate the 100th, 150th and 200th anniversaries of the first camp.

Since the late 20th century, Mow Cop is known for its Killer Mile, a one-mile road race from the railway level crossing on the western side of the hill, up to the castle. The race was first organized in the early 1980s by John Britton. The climb is also well known among local cyclists and features in the 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs in Britain.











































The universe timing is Perfect

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